The Language of Insurance


Learning
a foreign language can be extraordinarily frustrating. We often don’t
realize how difficult our own language is until we learn another
language or try to explain the inconsistencies to someone of a
different linguistic background. Once we have a command of a language
the peculiarities in its lexicons and grammar can become entertaining
instead of exasperating. On the Oxford Dictionaries website you can
find a chart of commonly confused words, which are useful for even
native English speakers. I had not considered the difference in
spelling and meaning between baited and bated before reading this
chart.

Let
us return to our dialect in the English language: Insurance.
The following are explanations of terms you may want to better
understand.


When
reading over an insurance policy or listening to an insurer explain
the policy, pay close attention to “exclusions.” An exclusion in
an
insurance policy
is an event that will not be covered by the policy. In a previous
blog I mentioned the exclusion of normal wear and tear in an
Automobile Insurance policy.


The
insurance policies that cover you and your family are known as
personal lines. For most people, personal lines are the only
insurance policies that they have to consider.

In
an email from word of the day by Merriam-Webster, I learned that
“bildungsroman” is “a novel about the moral and psychological
growth of the main character.” I recommend word of the day to
anyone who loves to learn about the English language.



Sources:

http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/personal-lines.html

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